Faculty

Maylei Blackwell

Associate Professor


Contact Information

Email    maylei@chavez.ucla.edu
Office  7349 Bunche
Phone  3109253082
Indigenous Women, Social Movements, Indigenous Migration, Transborder Organizing and Community Formation.

Maylei Blackwell is a two-spirit scholar activist of Cherokee and Thai heritage.   She has accompanied indigenous social movements for the past fifteen years developing a research expertise on the intersection of women’s rights and indigenous rights within Latin America and the US. 

Maylei Blackwell is a two-spirit scholar activist of Cherokee and Thai heritage.   She has accompanied indigenous social movements for the past fifteen years developing a research expertise on the intersection of women’s rights and indigenous rights within Latin America and the US.  More recently she has conducted community-based and collaborative research documenting cultural continuity and political mobilization with Zapotecs and Mixtecs from both the northern sierra as well as the central valleys of Oaxaca as well as the increasingly Mayan diaspora from Guatemala in Los Angeles.  In addition, she is a noted oral historian and author of ¡Chicana Power!  Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement, which was a finalist for the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians Book Prize and named by the Western Historical Association as one of the best book in western women and gender history.  Dr. Blackwell has served as an advisor to the Binational Front of Indigenous Organization and is currently the representative of the Abya Yala Working Group of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA).  Along with professors Mishuana Goeman and Wendy Teeter, she directs the Mapping Indigenous Los Angeles Project.

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Degrees

Ph. D., History of Consciousness Department (Women's Studies), University of California at Santa Cruz, 2000.
M. A., History of Consciousness Department, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1996
B. A., Double Major in History and Interdisciplinary Studies of Race and Gender, Minor in Spanish, California State University at Long Beach, 1993

Publications

Edited Volumes

Blackwell, M. 2013.  Editor of Special Dossier, Gender, Activism and the Border, a commemoration of the 25th Anniversary Publication of Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera:  The New Mestiza, Aztlán:  A Journal of Chicano Studies (Vol. 31, no. 1).

Journal Articles

Blackwell, M. 2012. “The Practice of Autonomy in the Age of Neoliberalism:  Strategies from the Indigenous Women’s Movement in Mexico.” Journal of Latin American Studies (Vol. 44, no 4):  703-722.

Blackwell, M.  2010.  “Líderes Campesinas:  Nepantla Strategies and Grassroots Organizing at the Intersection of Gender and Globalization.”  Aztlán:  A Journal of Chicano Studies.  Spring 2010 (Vol. 35, no. 1): 13-48. 

Maylei Blackwell, Rosalva Aída Hernández Castillo, Juan Herrera, Morna Macleod, Renya Ramírez, Rachel Sieder, María Teresa Sierra y Shannon Speed.  2009.  “Cruces de fronteras, identidades indígenas, género y justicia en las Américas.”  (“Cross Border Indigenous Identities, Gender and Justice in the Americas”).  In Desacatos, núm. 31, septiembre-diciembre:  pp. 13-34.

      Translated (English) and Reprinted:  Speed, Shannon, Maylei Blackwell, Aída Hernández, Juan Herrera, Morna Macleod, Renya Ramírez, Rachel Sieder and Teresa Sierra.  2009.  “Remapping Gender, Justice, and Rights in the Indigenous Americas:  Towards a Comparative Analysis and Collaborative Methodology.” Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association, Volume 14, No. 12: 300-331.

Blackwell, M. 2009.  “Mujer rebelde:  testimonio de Odilia Romero Hernández.”  (“Rebel Woman:  Testimony of Odilia Romero Hernandez”).  In Desacatos special issue on Reivindicaciones étnicas, género y justicia, núm. 31, septiembre-diciembre:  pp. 147-156.

Book Chapters 

Blackwell, M.  2014.  “Translenguas: Mapping the Possibilities and Challenges of Transnational Women’s Organizing across Geographies of Difference.”  Chapter in Translocalities/Translocalidades:  Feminist Politics of Translation in the Latin/a Americas, eds.  Sonia Alvarez, Claudia de Lima Costa, Veronic Feliu, Rebecca Hester, Norma Klahn, and Millie Thayer, eds.  Durham: Duke University Press, pp. 299-320.

Romero-Hernández, Odilia, Centolia Maldonado Vásquez, Rufino Domínguez-Santos, Maylei Blackwell y Laura Velasco.  2013.  “Género, generación y equidad: los retos del liderazgo indígena binacional entre México y Estados Unidos en la experiencia del FIOB (Gender, Generation and Equity:  The Challenges of Indigenous Binational Leadership between Mexico and the US in the FIOB).”  In Otros Saberes:  Collaborative Research on Indigenous and Afro-Descendent Cultural Politics, ed. Lynn Stephen and Charles R. Hale.  Santa Fe:  School for Advanced Research (SAR) and the Latin American Studies Association, pp. 75-101.

Blackwell, M.  2009.  “Zones of Autonomy:  Gendered Cultural Citizenship and Indigenous Women’s Organizing in Mexico.” In Gendered Citizenships: Transnational Perspectives on Knowledge Production, Political Activism, and Culture , ed.  Kia Lilly Caldwell, Kathleen Coll, Tracy Fisher, Renya K. Ramirez, and Lok Siu.  New York:  Palgrave Macmillan Press.  Pp.  39-54.

 

Blackwell, M.  2006.  “Weaving in the Spaces:  Transnational Indigenous Women’s Organizing and the Politics of Scale.”  In Shannon Speed, R. Aída Hernández, and Lynn Stephen (eds.)  Dissident Women:  Gender and Cultural Politics in Chiapas.  Austin, Texas:  University of Texas Press.  Pp. 240-318.